Low Country Road Runners to host local 5K for Boston

Low Country Road Runners to host local 5K for Boston

Boston Marathon victims will be commemorated with black ribbons at the London Marathon. (Photo courtesy of Low Country Road Runners)

On Monday April 15, President Barack Obama spoke at the White House to reassure Americans that whoever was responsible for the Boston Marathon bombings chose the wrong town to mess with:

“We still do not know who did this or why. And people shouldn’t jump to conclusions before we have all the facts. But make no mistake—we will get to the bottom of this. And we will find out who did this; we’ll find out why they did this […] any responsible groups will feel the full weight of justice […] Boston is a tough and resilient town. So are its people.”

During the President’s encouraging speech, Bostonians continued their work to help those injured in the explosion. With recent tragedies like this and the Newtown shooting, many have been comforted by the pictures of on-site heroes from Boston. Patton Oswalt, comedian and actor, tweeted about the event:

“Every once in awhile, the wiring of a tiny sliver of the species gets snarled and they’re pointed towards darkness […] So when you spot violence, or bigotry… hatred or ignorance, just look it in the eye and think, “The good outnumber you, and we always will.”

While not the most publicized group, the running community was also quick to reach out to those affected. Around Boston, beds and couches were being offered by the thousands for displaced runners and their families to sleep. Messages of support and remembrance went viral across social media platforms. National television and news update Americans as the investigation deepens, and runners across the country are organizing group runs to show support and solidarity for Boston.

On Sunday, April 21, the Low Country Road Runners (LCRR) is hosting a 5K so that Charlestonians to show their support. According to LCRR, the idea stemmed from a Twitter conversation between @AdrienneLevy and @RoadRunnerRic “about a spontaneous local casual run to support Boston.”  Through Facebook, the event spread out of the need for local Charleston runners “to just do something and not just standby, a need to show solidarity, to grieve, to mourn the Boston victims… and help heal our local runners’ worries,” LCRR said.

Route for LCRR’s Run for Boston. (Photo courtesy of Low Country Road Runners.)

At the time of publication, three people were killed and more than 170 people were injured by the bombings. The explosions in Boston have directed other races to increase their security. The London Marathon, to be held this coming weekend, will start with a 30 second moment of silence for Boston, and will continue with increased security along the course.

Organizers for an event much closer to home, the Cooper River Bridge Run, are also rethinking their security measures for the coming year. While 27,000 runners participated in this year’s Boston Marathon, 40,000 ran the Bridge Run this year. Participants in January 2014’s Charleston Marathon will also see increased security, and more conversation about participant and spectator safety with local Charleston Police, Fire and EMS agencies.

While these events are far in the future, LCRR’s Run for Boston 5K is taking place this Sunday. The run/walk will start at Colonial Lake, at the corner of Ashley and Broad, at 8 a.m. Runners are asked to come wearing their favorite race shirt from any past event and to kindly bring their own water.

The 5K route will take participants down the Battery, a loop many locals take daily. This is a reminder for runners that, like local Boston runners, this is our city. The running community will not be deterred, but banded closer together by this tragic event.

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About the Author

Leah SutherlandLeah is a managing editor of CisternYard News. She is a senior, majoring in Communication.

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1 Comment

  1. Tricia04-19-2013

    Are jogging strollers permitted to be ran with at this event?

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